Parents - Beware of Stuttering in Your Children

Sphere: Related Content

Most parents are not aware that stuttering is a disfluency that affects some children. Most parents do not even detect them early enough when their children begins to stutter. In most cases, it normally is third parties that come in and inform the parents to observe the child closely for stuttering.

Stuttering is a part of growth in children and it happens when they are still developing their speech faculties as well as their brains, normally between 2 and 5 years of age. Most of the time, the brain and the mouth faculties grow simultaneously. But sometime for reasons unknown, the brain develops much faster, and the resultant is the child begins to think faster than he or she can talk. This makes the child not pronounce the words as fast as he/she can think. So the child ends up stuttering the words. It's more of too much input than the outlet can release.

Parents should therefore watch out for signs of stuttering in their children and this should not be difficult. Any parent who is close to the child and constantly observes him/ her should notice an abnormal or extended stuttering speaking behavior. Normally at the first stages of their childhood the children will experience a simple stutter but when this is continuous then the parent should seek special attention. Stuttering occurs due to more than one factor, which may include genetics and defective child development. So parents need to ascertain with a specialist when they find that their child is stuttering.

Most parents get confused when they realize their kids stutter because they they do not know what to do with it. With extra help stuttering can be healed. Parents need to be informed to make this possible.

Ben Rick is a former stutterer who stuttered for 15 years, before he found a lasting solution to his stutter. He is now vouching for increased awareness of the defect to reduce the occurrence among people. He has since prepared a Guide for stammerers to help them in their healing process. For more information, click here:

Author's Links:
http://www.solvestammering.com

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

0 comments:

Post a Comment